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A series of new species have been found in the deep ocean areas of Costa Rica

Scientists recently made new discoveries in Costa Rican waters and discovered a treasure trove of new species of all shapes and sizes. They also found an area with a lot of garbage.

Researchers aboard the Schmidt Ocean Research Institute’s Falkort research vessel studied numerous routes connecting the deep sea, volcanic-bottom mountains, near Isla del Coco National Park off the coast of Costa Rica.

By performing 19 remote-controlled underwater dives, some of them thousands of meters deep, scientists have gained an unprecedented understanding of this unknown ecosystem.

Scientists have recorded several species of bacteria, cockles, starfish, corals, fish, octopus, sharks and rays. These include four new species of marine corals and six species of previously unknown science.

Each dive continues to amaze scientists, said Dr Erik Cordes, an underwater ecologist at Temple University in Philadelphia. for the discovery of the stony corals which built the reef at more than 800m of depth on two different seams. The most recent records of this species come from the deep waters around the Galapagos Islands.

Deep sea creatures are the largest habitats on Earth. Understanding the function of this habitat will help us understand what the entire planet is like.

However, scientists during one of the deepest dives to a depth of 3600 meters, discovered the presence of hazardous waste. To protect the ecosystem from the plagues of fishing and fishing, the researchers hope the new discovery in the deep sea will prompt authorities to create a new marine protected area around them.

This new research also supports Costa Rica’s efforts to preserve these important habitats by providing a base of incredible species and ecosystems found in deeper areas. They don’t always get the attention they deserve.

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