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The surprising truth about a series of golden spheres has emerged throughout the Milky Way

Mysterious and ghostly objects appear scattered in infrared images of the Milky Way which have been decoded by American scientists.

The strange golden spheres have never been discovered before because they are “newborn” objects: bubbles of ionized gas from newly formed star clusters.

Previously, the strange phenomenon has been observed on single infrared images from NASA’s Spitzer Telescope. According to a publication in the Astrophysical Journal, the authors estimate that the stars that create “golden balls” are only around 100,000 years old. “I think these are the stars still present in the fetus,” said Dr. Grace Wolf-Chase, astronomer at the Institute of Planetary Science in Naperville, Illinois (USA).

These are the worlds that lie with our own galaxy, because the beautiful Milky Way across the sky that we are observing is actually part of the Milky Way galaxy, which contains Earth.

According to Science News, the golden balls were initially thought to be just gas bubbles in the early stages of a large star. But analysis of more than 6,000 similar spheres has shown that they should be star clusters.

The authors note that the golden sphere only carries a “false” color, just like the image captured around the infrared lens. However, this vibrant color shows that it is an incredibly vibrant world, constantly changing and emitting intense energy.

This is an extremely interesting finding because it will help explain a lot about how a cluster was born and evolved. The stars in these clusters are extremely young, compared to our “middle-aged” Sun of 4.6 billion years old. 100,000 years or even 1/3 of the time our modern human Homo sapiens existed on Earth.

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